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suppression. we're told this is a return to the jim crow laws. well, frankly 80 percent of americans support the total idea pools. the thomas is a high percentage for any issue, even high and another that your humble pie because people are estranged and some people. chieftains of hispanics and african-americans support photo id. in fact, rasmussen asked, they believe and for a is a serious issue? 63 percent of whites said yes and 64 percent of african-americans said gm's. african americans in some places live where a machine controls the political left that the live under. frankly it allows the crime rates to skyrocket. the biggest victim of flow from is minority reformers and veterinarians were political machines control the destiny in the can't fight city of. the mayor of detroit who until recently was serving in public housing after conviction for crimes, he won his second term in part because of a flood of fraudulent ballots. the city clerk cluster job after that. abilene were asking for another florist, a town we could extend free finlandia's to anyone. i believe it's a small number. in
milwaukee and goes to stanford law school is becoming a clerk to supreme court justice robert jackson. tell us a little bit about how that came about, because i want to lead into what you unfold in here having to do with some of his conservativism on blacks and whites. >> guest: right, right. jackson was a, was, i think, seen by then even as a great justice. >> host: uh-huh. >> guest: and he had been the prosecutor at the nuremberg war trials. he'd actually taken time off from the court and gone to nuremberg and been the chief prosecutor and then come back to the court. and so rehnquist graduates from the stanford law school early at the end of 1952. he was, actually, in the class that would have graduated a semester later, but rehnquist finished his work. he was so smart -- >> host: yeah. >> guest: -- he got out early. so he wanted to, he -- it was clear when i was researching through his papers and looking at the diaries that he had actually, that were on deposit with his papers, which were fascinating. he had six notebooks that were filled with his reminiscences and his desires and early
in constitutional law. well, i'm here to say something about the argument of this book, which as you can have heard is called "i am the change." and the title is meant to bring out president obama's louis the xiv side. louis the xiv said -- i am the state. and mr. obama became very close in an press conference to saying i am the change. the title is actually from suggestion of my editor. and publishers, i had entertained another possibility, which was actually suggested to me my my friend bill. barack obama, what the hell were we thinking? [laughter] as opposed to some of my conservative colleagues and friends, i don't think we get very far by labeling president obama a socialist or by trying to trace his foreign origins or his secret muslim "devotions" nor i do think even that we greatly alumni nate things by to -- as my old friend argues in his movie and two books about obama. i think it's fairer to begin fairer and more useful in the end -- excuse me. to begin admitting president obama is what he call himself namely a progressive or a liberal. and the rest of the title is on barack obama and the
individuals who would rather work for those kinds of things that for hedge funds. or go to big law firms who are only going to help hedge funds in order to do it. we've really in the last 32 of 40 years in the united states have created great legal precedent. now we need to get somebody to start applying it. [applause] >> good evening. i am a graduate of as a new law school. i have my professor. >> looking. >> i want to say that i am the american dream. back came more than 25 years ago to the united states of america. and did not have one ballot in my pocket. i had two kids with me in another one in my belly. i went to smu. i raised my. [indiscernible] and the same time. the first one graduated from as a new law school. the second from harvard law school. smu. the second from harvard. the third one from airports academy. this is the glory of united states of america. [applause] also, i came from a communist romania. i leave half of my life in of free land, and i live half of my life under government control. what you presented today, it's not only dangerous for women because this last point
, looking up to the law, the rule of law and above all to the law of loss in the constitution. and so for them, you can see this in the where woodrow wilson trees the federalist. he talks about it all the time but as an acquaintance with the. he never studied it carefully as one might in many colleges and universities today because he is soon to the meaning of the federalist was with the federalists did, accomplished, the works that preceded from a, the doctrines of the federalist or optional. they belonged to the world that had been surpassed by contemporary american, and this was a principle that the presses supplied rather versus the to religion as well as to education and the politics. that is why president obama is not embarrassed to say, as he says in his second book, the audacity of hope, that he believes a living constitution. the phrase, and to a large extent the idea come from wilson . that turn sounds so green, so natural, so organic. one of those averments the laws that republicans are always opposing. that's a deliberate distraction. a living constitution, the principle o
at the school of law since january 1986. she teaches and writes in the area of evidence, constitution law, and women in the law. professor has been named to the mesh law institute and recognized one of the texas top women lawyers. and i also would like to introduce ken lambrecht president and chief executive off of planted parenthood. they are the largest reproductive health care provider in the state and one of the largest in the nation. it's networking of health certainlies merge this fall and they now serve central and north texas including austin, dallas, forth worth, tyler, and waco. planted parenthood have -- each year. planned parenthood in 2005 and brings more than twenty years of leadership experience in the health care industry. finally that brings us our keynote speaker tonight. most of us remember the moment that sandra she testified about seven months ago on the importance of requiring insurance plans to cover con stray seption. the remarks through the radio talk show host rush limbaugh who called her names. but maybe that isn't -- what isn't well known is that mrs. fluke dev
of massachusetts. while he lowered the tax burden on the people from one of the highest to one of the law were in the united states. that is a major sense of achievement and i admire that and i'm just delighted to be on the ticket with him. governor dukakis and i agree that we ought to have a trade policy for this country. but we've seen this administration more than double the national debt, that they've moved this country from the number one lender nation in the world to the number one destination in the world under their administration. they have not had a faith policy committee of let trade be a handmaiden for the policy objectives of the country. that this country has exported to many jobs and not enough profits. and as i work to pass a trade bill through the united states senate, through roadblocks every step of the way but we passed a trade bill that any country that has full access to the markets we are entitled to full access to their markets. now that means that we are going to stand tough for america and we are going to protect those jobs coming and we aren't a push american product
" is much law-abiding and much more manipulative and vicious than the joseph holt i know and underhanded. i think one of the things that the film tries to suggest is the federal government largely in the person of edwin stanton and the person of joseph holt basically railroaded poor mary to her death, and without any interest in what the truth was. they determined that she how would hang regardless and they went after her poor mary. and this just isn't the way the assassination trial played out. there was no deal between stanton and holt to make sure that she was convicted an son. it makes him out to a truly vengeful, two-dimensional character and doesn't reflect who he is as i know him. >> during the administration must have been a difficult job. could you sort of expand upon what that job was maybe before the war and the job that he ended up in? >> well, the job the before the war was basically there was one person who had a small office who kept track of whatever sorts of military sense occurred in an army that was 16,000 people strong. right up prior to the war. that's how big the u.s.
, abide by the rule of law, support independence, judiciary's and uphold fundamental freedom. upholding the rights and dignity of all citizens, regardless of faith, ethnicity or gender, should be expected. of course, we look to government to let go of power when their time comes, just as the revolutionary libyan transitional national council did this past august, transferring authority to the newly elected legislature, in a ceremony ambassador chris stevens cited as the highlight of his time in the country. achieving genuine democracy and broad base growth will be a long and difficult process. we know that from our own history. 235 years after our own revolution we are still working towards that more perfect union. so one should expect setbacks along the way. times when some will surely ask if it was all worth it. but going back to the way things were in december of 2010 isn't just undesirable, it is impossible. this is the context in which we have to view recent events and shape our approach going forward. and let me explain where that leads us. since this is a conference on maghreb th
. there were people in legal law firm conference rom, they could get an internet connection. people in starbucks where they could get an internet connection. people working at the kitchen tables around town. and all of a sudden, right around april 1st. bestart moving to the headquarter. this is literally six week aways from the announcement. and this just this big space. bigger than the room. far bigger than the room. three or four times of the size of the room. it was a whole floor of the high-rise building in chicago, and it was just kind of remarkable. we didn't have everybody in. we were slowly bringing people in. literally we were still getting the servers up. we had telephones ringing and people try to answer phone calls. we had e-mail coming in to our e-mail address. we didn't have a system to receive e nail a real way that you would want. we had many coming many. we didn't have budgets. and we had, you know, we had constituency leaders calling our political department because they wanted to have time with the candidate, we had our fundraisers, who had to raise money with the
might address that gap. [laughter] there are six products of harvard law school and three products of yale law school on the supreme court. there are apparently no other law schools in the united states. [laughter] besides those two. no, it is a bizarre and unfortunately fact, i think. but those are, i hope, interesting facts about the supreme court. but frankly, i don't think they're very important. here's an important fact. about the supreme court. there are five republicans and four democrats. i will speak for somewhat longer, but this is basically all you need to know. [laughter] if be there's a takeaway here, i have gotten to the point early. there are five republicans and four democrats, and that really tells you much of what you need to know. and it is true that the justices wear robes because they're supposed to look all alike, and they're supposed to look, you know, it's supposed to give the perception that they're all pretty much the same, but just as on the other side of first street the united states congress is deeply divided according to party, so is the united states
this old house and senate which is unrepresentative with the what the country has just voted making laws you know that are contrary to what the new house and senate are going to do? i think most likely for all the fears and lord knows we will cover it on cable news, of a fiscal cliff my guess is just that they will put it off. >> and we do see the likelihood of a deal to make a deal as they are saying but there are two complications to that. there is one incentive for the markets day by day and there will be a lot of incentive to reassure the markets but the two, the two impediments to that, one the white house intends to play real hardball. they feel by putting it off, they loose their leverage and they do not plan to just extend all that, punk all that. there is going to be a fighter for that and second of president obama wins, paul ryan is going to be back in the house. he probably will be running for president in 2016. if paul ryan is back and running for president he is not going to want to make a deal that sees raising revenue, raising taxes and the conservatives will listen to him
-- berkeley where he attended law school. he was, i'm sad to report, not much of a student, but he was a joiner of fraternities and maker of friends. and it was there at berkeley that he came of age just as california bulldozed its way into a new kind of politics in state history. the political movement that warren was witness to was, importantly from the his perspective, led by a trial lawyer. even as a somewhat shy young boy, warren had dreamed of practicing law in a courtroom, and as a college student he had the opportunity to watch up close one of the most arresting trial lawyers of his generation. hiram johnson, of whom i'm speaking, was a young lawyer in san francisco who was could upon to take over a corruption case against the city's mayor and some co-conspirators in a bribery scandal. he took over the case, he was second chair of the case at the outset but took over the first chair when the lead prosecutor was shot in the head in court by a dismissed juror. law students, take note. [laughter] it -- johnson made his name in that case and went on to serve as governor of cali
. it was the law passed unanimously by congress signed by president clinton in 1993 to restore the scope of religious freedom protection that existed under the free exercise clause which we were railing against. withstand back in place, struck down by the states in 1997 but the federal government, mandated by federal law, we already had two early decisions from district courts involving private plaintiffs or for profit plaintiffs and the issue to address the merits, there were procedural issues because of ongoing regulatory process that might create a sort of interim step in terms of going up and down the court but that actually is going to get resolved between now and august 1st, 2013. the administrative process will be done and the courts will invariably go straight and you will get merit decisions uniformly by the end of next year. >> those that depend on what the administration does and who wins? >> not really. what the administration has put into play is a piece of the problem. and also the constraints they put upon themselves in addressing that limited issue indicates that there is
at campaign finance from, as funders or as organizers expect the law to change again by the next cycle or the one after that? >> i don't think so. i think the supreme court has made very clear where it stands on citizens united, on money and politics but i think if anything the trend will probably accelerate in a few different ways, and they've been very -- i think he recently turned down a challenge, right, brad, on some aspect of citizens and re-emphasize no, we actually believe this. of course, we're entering an era where supreme court's don't really respect a president in the same way they used to so that if there are new justices added, if obama wins reelection and there are more democratic appointed judges commits very easy to imagine a fight for decision reversing or changing in some way. under the current course i think made very plain that your this is how, this their belief, this is the constitutional principle but they will keep applying it. i'm not aware but i'll see any evidence of a series reconsideration of the principal in citizens or think in speech now spent the supre
, and that it should be abolished, regardless of what the laws of the state or the country said at the time. she came to brunswick because her husband got a job at bowdoin college. he stayed in ohio and and later moved to andover, in order to complete his contract there is a professor. she came without him with their children, and she was also six months pregnant. and she moved to brunswick in order to take up residency here, awaiting the arrival of her husband. the stories that were told of harriet beecher stowe is that she was a small and petite woman. she did not take much care in terms of how she dressed. but she was also very numerous for a woman of her time. she was known then mostly as a housewife. she wrote that she was totally overwhelmed with the number of children -- she had seven and she was pregnant -- that is what you would see as an overworked housewife and mother who came to worship here, probably with her children and her sisters, catherine beecher, and they all became members of this church. we first meet uncle tom in his hut. he is in a slave huts. he is learning to read the bible.
't need sharia in the constitution. he has everything he needs in the laws of the united states, because i see them being in great continuity. and for instance, the law, the press law of 1975 is enough to implement any anti-blasphemy laws, for instance. you don't need to implement sharia to go against blasphemy, or even to constraint expression public, freedom of expression. so in a way i'm optimistic, of course, about tunisia but cautiously optimistic. because i think what you see there is the continuity of the old state. it doesn't seem that there are any intentions to change the institutions of the old state. which, in fact, are very useful for both tunis and another to reshape society for tunis and a modernist direction, and for another in an islamist one. so i will stop here, and i look forward to our discussions. thank you spent thank you very much, malika. that was a model, superb analysis and remedy at the same thing. i also have a sign here that says please continue. i'm not exactly what i use that particular sign. but i'm trying to figure that out. it's rather intimidating. gina,
. they were passing right to work laws. they were receiving lots of funding for the federal government to build military installations at a time when the united states was involved in the cold war with the soviet union, so states like mississippi, states like georgia, texas, florida, southern california, arizona and north carolina are all being transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift in population. just think about it. this period from 1964 to 2008 can be thought of this kind of the period of sunbelt dominance in the american presidential history. if you think about it, every president elected from 1964 to 2008 comes from a state of the sunbelt. lyndon johnson from texas, richard nixon from california, gerald ford was not even elected vice president. he was from michigan. jimmy carter from georgia, ronald reagan from california, the first george bush from texas and bill clinton from arkansas and the second bush from texas. so 2008 is in some ways a watershed election it's in being the four-year period of sunbelt dominance. there were issues that were critical
of them think that i'm a fat person and say that we should pass laws preventing this kind of obesity, and create ways to federally subsidize weight-loss programs. who do they blame? they blame mcdonald's. why is that? because they sell delicious and fattening cheeseburgers and fries along with salads and mcnuggets an awful lot of other things, even the beloved happy meal is under assault. under assault by politicians all around the country and by some who call themselves scientists. one group of the very official sounding name, the center for science in the public interest, threatened to sue mcdonald's if they did not stop serving happy meals. they equated what mcdonald's was doing was child abuse and even worse, equated to child molestation. stephen gardner said in a prepared statement, he said it is a creepy and predatory practice that warrants an injunction. let's face it, it was gardner's statement that sounded creepy. the fact is that liberals hate mcdonald's and its competitors because they symbolize everything about america that they load. our entrepreneurial zero, a level of
to agree with you with their level of investments. >> second row on the side. >> after rule of law committee for the oceans, in the mid century, nicholas said geography was one of the most important factors in foreign affairs because it was the most permanent. this year we just saw the arctic icecap dropped another 750,000 square kilometers and appears to be opening more this session. what do you think this trend will mean not next year or even next decade but in a generation as that becomes more open for russia and canada in particular. >> nicholas pikeman is someone i devote a whole chapter to in this book because he is very provocative and here is the man who when it was unclear that china where defeat japan, predicted that china who is our ally at the time would become our adversary for geographical reasons and also said when europe was fighting for its life against germany, united europe could be a competitor for the united states. she was very clear volume. in terms of the arctic icecap, this is playing out over decades. if you had an arctic open for shipping and a close frie
significant to link them. his support for lincoln's policies are very important in the story is just an law so i thought it was time somebody brought that story to light. >> we are the maine state library in a public reading room and were going the maine author's collection. in the early 1920s, henry tunick who is the state laboring at the time started collecting books by maine writers trying to get them signed whenever possible and it has grown into this. >> welcome to maine's capital city on booktv. with the help of our time warner cable partners or the next 90 minutes we will explore the literary culture of this area as we visit with local authors and explore special collections that help tell the history of not only this state but the country as well. >> this is the first parish church in brunswick maine and it's significant to the story of uncle tom's cabin. in many plays places stories began here. it is here in this pew, pew number 23 that harriet beecher stowe by her account saw a vision of uncle tom dean clips to death. now uncle tom, as you probably know, is the title, the hero of her
-- pill to swallow and the best way to get them to do that was to stress that this was the law. this was the rule of law and he is president was going to take care of the law. it made it much easier, and easier pill for the south to swallow. [applause] >> jonathan is great to be with you today and with all the booklovers at this fabulous festival and with a very distinguished biographer, jean edward smith way think has contributed immeasurably to the eisenhower scholarship and i have to agree he was underestimated definitely and i'm so glad that you have written such a powerful book. i think it's fascinating in reading the book to see that more of the book is focused on the military career, even though as you've just spent almost most of your time talking about the incredible eight years of of the eisenhardt registration, the estate leaned over and whispered to me i have never heard the interstate highway system applauded before. pretty exciting. first-time. >> all those people who were applauding are now going to get on 395 and be stuck in traffic or three hours. [laughter] po
lost his job. the brennan center at nyu school of law has been thorough investigation at the idea of voter fraud. they say basically it doesn't exist. there've been 10 or 12 cases in the first 10 years of this century out of hundreds of millions of those spirits someone may register as mickey mouse, but mickey mouse never shows up in rows. but nevertheless, rove has initiated a cam pain and its allies in more than 30 states legislature of having votes requiring voter ids. now part of the democrats are saying this is a severe form of voter suppression. that is in many cases you find the elderly was given up their drivers licenses, but it's perfect years, the out they no longer have a government issued i.d., so they are not allowed to vote. you have minorities that is hispanic. one of the challenge is hispanic timebomb. now there'll be 70 million in 2020. if they start to vote on that, it's going to be curtains for the republican speakers 10 million hispanics in texas alone. states like texas and arizona will flip from red to blue very soon, when sakic said. so this is one thing the
-year associates in law firms, they make about the same. but women on average choose to work fewer hours than men even when they work full time. because, you know, full time is anything above 35 hours a week.r and women work about 12% i fewet hours. about 25% of women work part time. many women go in and out of the work force as they have children, and that on average reduces their average earnings,o but it doesn't mean that they're discriminated against. average s their average earnings, but it doesn't mean they are discriminated against. it doesn't mean if you take to women into men in the same job they don't earn the same. they do. >> what is the paycheck fairness act, and do you think it is necessary? >> the paycheck fairness act just was up again for a voting congress. it failed. it also failed when there was a democratic house senate and president and barack obama's first term. that's because it would require them to report to the government the women they have on their payroll, the men have on that there'll come how much they pay both groups. and that's an attempt of a government should tr
are your thoughts? >> caller: i just think it's unfortunate that today we need this kind of law we. look at the ayaan to leave the unemployment rate on its higher among black and it is white, so there's still discrimination going on in this country, and we still need this law. it's really unfortunate. >> host: will be in jacksonville florida, independent. your thoughts are next, willie. >> caller: yes, good morning. it must not be enough highly educated black institutions say i have to go to harvard to get a certain education. we don't have -- we reached the same criteria. we are still lacking and i get an education at the school. i just don't understand. they have no qualified school that is on the same level with these schools and professors on the same level. uc-irvine saying? >> host: here is the 28 president of the university of texas at austin writing in today's wall street journal traer. he writes history repeats itself when they are in an ironic way the university of texas goes before the supreme court to defend the missions. it lasted 62 years ago when he men's white and african
class i or comet that would seem to be the law of the jungle is aware, are categorically different as well. we can certainly see this radical dehumanization inerrant history. black slaves are not only that they are, but were fundamentally different than their white slave owners. never remaining wholly in the realm of either philosophy or psychology, but i was training samples from her experience in the world, smith argues that they want to overcome our tendons used to dehumanize, which lead to atrocities and genocide, we must look these tendencies square in the face. we must study down honestly, openly, in order to control them. "less than human" has garnered lavish praise from scholars. in the evolutionary psychology, looks like smith should be required reading for all with a social conscience. his ideas that define their way into every school curriculum. the psychologist paul bloom calls it a beautiful book on an ugly topic. charles w. mills, dean of moral philosophy calls it, and i quote, a powerful and original work that forces us to recognize the monstrous atrocities are routi
and groups of men. rather than as the law holds right now, men and women in comparable jobs in the same job. so what they're trying to do is have equal pay for equal work, not equal pay for equal work, which is two very different things. there's no reason why groups of women and groups of men in the same firm should be paid the same if they have radically different jobs. look at exxon, for example, that is a group of men and oil drilling activities. it's a dirty dangerous job. you could not get me to do. you have to pay people a lot to risked their lives doing that kind of work. exxon has a group of women in communications, assistant jobs, publications. there's no reason these two groups should be necessarily paid the same. but the paycheck benefit would be moving toward requiring firms to pay men and women the same, even if they're in very different jobs. that is not paycheck fairness. that's communism. >> diana furchtgott-roth, your book, women's figures, was there a time when women were treated unfairly in the work place? >> there certainly was. there were times in the 1950s and 1960s, y
the grandmother and build new education and yet segregation, jim crow law rose above it and insisted that his grandson's rise above its. fight, participate, eliminate but do not be consumed by it. in so many ways we talk about the founding fathers and yet the house fell in a way because of the contradiction and the generation rebuilds it. frederick others see -- frederick and others. do we today in our law and our culture give enough credit to that refunding? >> you think of the great moments in our history. we talk about of course the revolution, certainly the constitution that we celebrate now, 225 years. it was all coming apart and the country as we know today is reshaped after the civil war. the constitutional law what would it look like if there were no 14th amendment to the states. there is so much that goes beyond the war. i tell my clerks we have to go to gettysburg. this isn't just about pulling these little threads out of what we do every day about journalism and original was on and we argue it is much bigger than that. i see some people here who argue before the court. i'm not once
by the rule of law, support independent judiciary and uphold fundamental freedoms. upholding the rights and the dignity of all citizens, regardless of faith, ethnicity, or gender, should be expected. and then of course we look to governments to let go of power when their time comes, just as the revolutionary libyan transitional national council did this past august. transferring authority to the newly-elected legislature in a ceremony that ambassador chris stevens cited as the highlight of his time in the country. achieving genuine democracy and broad-based growth will be a bomb and difficult process. we know that from our own history. within 235 years after our own revolution, we are still working toward that more perfect union. so one should expect setbacks along the way, times when some will surely ask if it was all worth it. but going back to the way things were in december 2010 isn't just undesirable, it is impossible. so this is the context in which we have to view of recent events anshaped our approach going forward. and let me explain where that leads us. now, since this is a co
. >> hi, public international law policy group. while growing prospects to use the for u.s. influence in the region, especially given the security problems in a recent embassy attacks and challenges await governance and weak institutions. >> a great book to read on that it's not too much promised land by aaron david miller. he is a great section on how strong we think we are in the region and what we can get done and what the people on the ground think we can get done. we need to work with our allies. we need to talk to local intelligence services. that's a big problem now. we've lost contact in the intelligence services that we provide information about the bad guy. >> at huge cost -- i mean, it's not like there's any great nostalgia for the egyptians, right? >> the thing is we have a great relationship. at the end of his life, gadhafi, when condoleezza rice visited a think in 2006 or 2007, i think nixon's visit, vice president nixon's visit in 1967 or 68 was the big achievement of the bush administration put forward that they brought libya back in the cold. yes, there were human rig
people actually in hotel conference rooms. there were people in legal, like law firm conference rooms so they could get an internet connection. they donated space. people working at starbucks where they could get an internet connection. people working at their kitchen tables frankly around town. so all of a sudden right around april 1st we start moving into our headquarters, finally. this is six weeks away from the announcement, maybe longer. just this big space. bigger than this room. far bigger than this room. three or four times the size of this room. it wrapped around. a whole floor of a high-rise building in chicago. it was just, kind of remarkable because we didn't have everybody in yet. we were slowly bringing people in but literally we were still getting our servers up. we had telephones ringing. we had people trying to answer phone calls. we are e-mail coming in to our e-mail dress, right? we didn't have a system to receive e-mail in a real way you would want. we have money coming in but we didn't have budgets yet. we had constituency leaders calling our political department bec
can practice our laws as we see fit. >> more about harriet beecher stowe's this weekend as booktv, american history tv and c-span local content vehicles with behind-the-scenes at the history of literary life of augusta, maine and noon eastern on booktv on c-span2 and sunday at 5:00 p.m. on american history tv on c-span3. >> michael grunwald presents his thoughts on the $800 billion stimulus bill, the american recovery reinvestment act signed into law by president obama on february 17, 2009. this is about 50 minutes. [applause] >> thanks, all of you, for coming and braving the rain. i am thrilled to start by 4 in new york. my wonderful parents are here. the only new yorkers who go to florida to visit their grandchildren. there are a lot of facts and figures and fun characters and colorful stories. i knew it was going to be controversial and it would be revisionist history of the obama stimulus and everybody hates the obama stimulus. obama he did too. a year after it passed a percentage of americans who believe the stimulus created jobs was lower than the percentage of americans w
, but the word career in the '60s was hardly ever mentioned. some women went on to navy medical school or law school but most women were expected to have a job until they get married and have children. we came to "newsweek" thinking that this is a fabulous, and it was, a very glamorous job to have in those days. we started as actually women were hired on a male desk to deliver the mail. and you graduated to clipper where you clicked newspapers and deliver them to the riders. if you are really good you got to be a researcher. that was a real exciting job because, in fact, you worked on the stories of the week that were breaking news. you worked with writers, reporters, the editors. and those of us who work in the sections in the back of the magazine, from medicine or the arts or lifestyle or religion, did a lot of reporting as did the women in the business section because new york was the financial capital of the world. so we got to be reporting in addition to the fact checking. and it was a very collegial place. we were good friends with the writers and reporters. it was a patriarchal place.
the law. and i said they were bad laws. their customs, they were tradition, and we wanted america to be better to live up to the declaration of independence, make real our democracy. when i got arrested the first time this books and i felt free. i felt liberated and today more than ever i feel free in the liberated. abraham lincoln 150 years ago freed the slaves but it took the modern-day civil rights movement to elaborate a nation. [applause] i know some of you are asking where did you get the name "across that bridge," where do to get the title from, life lessons and the vision for change? just like a few short years ago since this is an election year, hundreds and thousands and millions of people come in 11 states and the old confederacy from virginia to texas couldn't register to vote simply cause of the color of their skin. people stood in line. it took a state like the state of mississippi in 1963, 1964, 1965 more than four need to keep those in the but only about 16 those and were registered to vote. there was a county in my native state of alabama and the heart of the blac
of testing. ever since no trial left behind was enacted into law is a national psychosis. not just bad pedagogy but something psychotic. my father was a psychiatrist and used to take me to the back toward the of the mental hospital in massachusetts. some of the people in the most severe depression, the only way to ease discomfort was it to number everything. restlessly a moving objects around to get them in the right pattern dead number them. i don't know. i think some of the bureaucrats who gave us this law maybe they would enjoy this day in a recovery house to get over the numerical addiction. judging teachers and children primarily on the basis of a very narrow slice of mechanistic skills to be measured simplistically by standardized exam and ruling out the consequence, ruling out to the rich forms of culture like reading books for pleasure. what other reason is there to read a book and the way? but pleasure is not tested. no points for pleasure. asking koppel questions? indulging curiosity? developing real critical capacity so when they grow up can be discerning citizens. forget it
. he is a graduate of harvard and law degree from the university of chicago. eliza krigman of "politico," next question. >> yes, a very impressive background for this position. since you have worked as verizon communications, have you been lobbied by any of the people that you used to work with? >> guest: i have not, no. >> okay. on that same topic, i'd like to ask is the fcc supposed to operate in the public interest, but the reality of the matter is most of the people who comment on the public record are the well-heeled lobbyists, and that's who the commission also spends a lot of time meeting with. what are you going to do personally to make sure your opinion's informed by the average consumer? >> guest: at my confirmation hearing in november of last year, i stated i would hold no favor for or prejudice against any particular company, person or segment of the industry. and i would like to think that in the four-and-a-half months that i've had the privilege of serving at the fcc that i've stayed true to that. i've taken literally hundreds of meetings, some of them have been with repre
rule of law, no longer the best. we still have a work ethic bear. if you're going to invest one place in this planet, it would be here. so we've got to get beyond. we don't have the divine right to success. we got to get immigration rights, fiscal policy right, otherwise it's another gift call shale oil. my god, the most profligate energy nation the planet. kaaba tenants that i know you miss it all that energy. were going to give you one more shot. let's hope you do this one right. so we have a problem. we should diagnose the problem. if you look at america today, why are we going to 2%? this one i can't prove. but i believe that europe isn't going to sink us, but there's a huge wet blanket out here in the wet blanket to name resolving uncertainty, real insurgency on taxes, policies, fiscal cliff. we have this constant business, not just a minute, the regulatory bee gees. i travel around america. wherever i go come businesspeople are faced terrible. we've done it to ourselves, folks. get rid of that wet blanket and it will take off. there's a great article that someone reprinted in "t
's unconstitutional to be -- to bar women from combat because it denies them equal protection under the law. >> host: now, you also wrote a novel -- >> guest: i did. >> host: called "sand queen," what is this? >> guest: i'm writing a cycle on the iraq war, fiction and non-fiction combined. it's a woman in iraq at the very beginning of the war, guarding the first and biggest prisoner of war camp we set up over there, and it goes back and forth between her story, her experience as a woman soldier, and the story of an iraqi civilian woman. they meet at a check point, and they begin to interact. in is based on things that my soldiers had experienced, and that you get to see the war from both the iraqi and american point of view, but told through the eyes of women which is a rare way to tell stories of war. >> host: when you look back at the media coverage of the iraq war and currently the afghanistan war, do you feel it's been fair? do you think it's been comprehensive? >> guest: it depends which nation's media you're asking about. >> host: u.s.. >> guest: i think we did a very bad job at the beginning
of the obstacles that she face. more women than men are in law school and medical school now. and so, when elizabeth dole would describe how she was one of 24 women at harvard law school, is really an older notion at this point. if you get distances her from the younger audience is. so i don't think it's a good idea for modern women candidate to keep describing the obstacles they face and how unique they are because we tend to resist voting for someone who was the first of anything because it seems scary and probably not a good idea because it's never done it before. so i think taking attention away from that is better. >> and not labeling issues as women's issues are feminist issues. i think all the women in the book really didn't run as women. there's a book called running as a woman. but when pat schroeder ran the first time for congress on colorado, someone asked her to come her to come into play and is running as a woman? her question was, do i have another option? [laughter] it is obvious this is a woman. it's obviously never had a woman president. so i don't think you need to make a
'm doing. i take your point. i vaguely remember the three laws of dynamics. so yeah, i take your point but my point is less would've the undergraduate, i don't know we can argue but how important that is, but more, i take your point about the commercialization and the browsers and all that was definitely private, occasional borrowing for more basic research, but my point was that seems like a really critical element was sort of just was the critical mass of people out there, and the guys who founded google were guys who were getting their ph.d's at stanford, you know, and they developed an algorithm out of their training. and just the fact that she did have people working on systems engineering, and it's less the undergraduate but more the government finance, dod research, networking capabilities and all that. look, it's sort of unprovable but there is a story that the critical mass that few -- field itself is built up out there and if you want an explanation for why it happened here and so little happen if their. >> guest: one thing i would say is this. in leading up to 2000 women got
most of the financial institute would say listen, we would go ahead and we would be making more laws, we would be investing more on behalf of the people we represent. but we are not going to make loans -- we will see on the cpb there was a credit card act of 2009 there was a provision, it is an example of the pendulum swing too far one way, that if you were, it was pretty specific, if you were a stay-at-home mom, not a number of a household, so you could be married, have a full-time companion, if that other person work and used it on, you couldn't get access to credit. because you didn't have a job to stay home. now, the cfpb didn't fix it. of everyone else feels about the cpb in terms of the kind thing system are not doing but that's one thing i think they did get right. but that's just one small example of a credit issue. >> look, dodd-frank was written in anger. it was. people are angry and they're trying to cover up their own involvement in this deal. the second thing about that, it had 250 some required new regulations, and 150 some suggested new regulations. >> many of which ha
. steve jobs, you name it. we invest more in capital equipment. we have good rule of law. the protestant work ethic is still there. it will be here. so we have to get beyond that. the divine right to success. immigration, fiscal policy. otherwise another gift. and me, my god. looked down and said, i know all that. one more shot. so we have a problem. we should diagnose the problem. if you look at america today, corporations are ingratiate. why are we going to 2%? in this one i can't prove. this city is okay. there is a huge wet blanket out here. and to me the uncertainty, real certainty around taxes, policies, fiscal cliff. the debt ceiling fiasco. this constant anti business not just sentiments, but regulatory ag's. wherever i go i have business people. the regulatory environment. they all say it's terrible. it's not just banks. we have done it to ourselves. shoot ourselves in the foot. get rid of that white blanket. and they're is a great -- printed in the wall street journal. kate president-elect ronald reagan some advice. consistent taxes, regulatory. the same positive story over and
are in law school and medical school now. wind elizabeth dole would describe how she was one of 24 women at harvard law school, it really is an older notion at this point, and i think it distances her from the younger audiences. i don't think it is a good idea for our modern women candid it's debbie describing the obstacles that they face and how unique they are because we tend to resist voting for someone who is the first of anything because it seems scary and throw another good idea because we have never done before. i think taking attention away from that is better. >> and not labeling issues as women's issues are feminist issues. at think all of the women in the book really did not run as women . there is a book called running as a woman. i cannot remove the first name, but when pat schroeder ran the first time for congress out in colorado somebody asked her, do you plan on running as a woman and her response was, do i have another option. end it is obvious that this is a woman. obviously have never had a woman president. i don't think you need to make a point of it. all of these wom
in the other financial institutions and the answer is that there is no law that they could hang them on. they could find nothing illegal and it wasn't for the want of trying and that's why we've still not seen the high level executives go to jail and why they are trying to push forward all of this nonsense financial reform the haven't been able to do. >> i don't know if it was for want of trying. >> you have the attorney general and the banks to own the place as upset about the senate. there wasn't an urge to prosecute. there were three questions i just want to be fair to affairs if you could change any part of the book, what would it be? >> that's a good question. i wonder if they mean if i would have written something or if the book history could have been different. >> if i would have written something differently that is an interesting question. i would like to have actually talked to kerry killinger, so that would have changed. i could have spent the entire book talking about the last month because there were so many politics and the decision appeared. >> has anyone been fascinated
is banned, there is no rule of law, and perceived political infractions are met with harsh punishment. punishment that it needed out to three generations of person's family. a political offender knows that with he goes to prison, his parents and his children will probably go with him. there are probably about 200,000 north koreans today, and more than a million perhaps as high as 2 million have already died there. the reason we know all of this is and much, much more is thanks to the testimonies of north koreans who have escaped. these are the people i write about in my book. this knowledge comes to us despite the best effort of the kim family regime to keep it secret. for more than fifty years, ever since the end of the korean war, they have within saled off from the world's eyes. the kim family regime pursued an eyelationist policy and mains an iron grip on information. access to which is very strictly controlled. to give just one example, every radio must be registered with the government. and it's dial must be fixed to the government run radio station. to enforce this rule, securi
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